How Much Does Latisse Cost?

    Although there are several products on the market that promise longer, thicker lashes, Latisse is currently the only treatment approved by the FDA for enhancing the length, thickness and color of your eyelashes. 

    Our Latisse 101 guide goes into more detail on how Latisse works, from the basics of applying it to your eyelashes to what you can expect after using the medication. 

    As a prescription medication, you’ll need to talk to a doctor before you can purchase and use Latisse. We offer Latisse online, subject to doctor approval and an online consultation, with discreet delivery to your door.

    Latisse Pricing

    Latisse comes in two different sizes. The 3 ml bottle of Latisse is designed to provide enough liquid solution and applicators for approximately one month of use. The larger 5 ml bottle has 140 applicator brushes and is designed to last for approximately two months.

    The 3 ml bottle of Latisse and sterile applicators runs about $110. This size provides you with enough Latisse solution and sterile applicators to last for one month, even if you occasionally make mistakes during application and need to use an extra applicator.

    We've seen the 5 ml bottle of Latisse and sterile applicators for about $160. This size is a better option if you prefer to have a longer-lasting supply of Latisse available at home, without having to order as frequently.

    Purchasing the larger bottle of Latisse also provides slightly better value, making it a good choice if you’re planning to use this medication long term.

    Latisse Pricing vs. Other Eyelash Treatments

    Used long term, Latisse is typically the most cost-effective way to grow longer, thicker and darker eyelashes. Below, we’ve compared the pricing of Latisse to several other common treatments used to enhance the eyelashes:

    • Eyelash extensions, which don’t promote growth of your eyelashes but can create the appearance of longer, thicker eyelashes, can generally cost anywhere from $100 to $400, based on the salon you choose and your location.

      Extensions usually last for six to eight weeks, although you’ll usually need to go back to the salon every three to four weeks for maintenance. It usually costs $50 to $170 to get your eyelash extensions filled in, making this a fairly costly option.

    • Lash Boost, an over-the-counter eyelash growth serum made by multi-level marketing company Rodan + Fields, costs $155 per tube and is designed to last for approximately two to three months.

      However, there’s no scientific evidence that this product works, and it does not contain the same FDA-approved, science-backed active ingredients as Latisse. Our Latisse vs. Lash Boost guide goes into more detail on the differences between these products.
    • Other eyelash serums, such as those sold on Amazon, range anywhere $20 all the way up to hundreds of dollars. Like Lash Boost, these products aren’t approved by the FDA and typically don’t contain ingredients that are supported by scientific evidence.
    • False eyelashes are a cheap and simple way to create the illusion of longer eyelashes, although you’ll need to apply them daily. Long-term use of false eyelashes can also lead to damage to your natural lashes, especially if you wear them every day.

      Depending on the brand you choose, a set of false eyelashes can usually cost anywhere from $5 to $40. Generally, higher-priced false eyelashes look more realistic than the cheaper ones, although none have a completely natural appearance. 

    Is Latisse Worth It?

    At a cost of about $110 per month, Latisse is an affordable, effective way to grow longer, thicker and darker eyelashes. 

    Compared to eyelash extensions, Latisse offers several advantages. First, it’s quick and easy to apply. Once you’ve mastered the art of applying Latisse using the sterile applicator, it only takes a minute or two to apply it to your upper eyelids daily.

    Second, instead of simply creating the illusion of longer eyelashes, Latisse actually helps grow longer lashes. According to FDA data, 79 percent of people who use for 20 weeks Latisse notice a significant increase in their eyelash prominence. 

    As for Lash Boost and other over-the-counter eyelash serums, while these may be less expensive than Latisse, there’s no scientific evidence that these products actually work. For the most part, these products contain non-clinical ingredients that aren’t actually linked to eyelash growth.

    We’ve covered this topic in more detail in our guide to the differences between Latisse and Lash Boost, as well as other over-the-counter eyelash serums. 

    Learn More About Latisse

    As the only FDA-approved treatment for growing longer, thicker and darker eyelashes, Latisse is worth considering if you’re unhappy with the appearance of your lashes and want to take action using a safe, science-backed medication.

    Our Latisse 101 guide goes into more detail about how Latisse works and how you can use it to grow longer, more prominent eyelashes. 

    This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment.