Mental Health

Personalized mental health services that fit your needs—on your schedule.

Anxiety & depression
medication

Anxiety & depression medication

Online therapy sessions

Online therapy sessions

Mental wellness supplements

Mental wellness supplements

Customer reviews

Customer reviews

It’s your time. With so many different types of therapy available, we work with healthcare providers who create personalized online mental health care plans designed especially for your needs, on a platform that works with your schedule.

It’s your time. With so many different types of therapy available, we work with healthcare providers who create personalized online mental health care plans designed especially for your needs, on a platform that works with your schedule.

Anxiety and depression treatment plans designed around your needs

100% secure online process with vetted online therapists and healthcare providers experienced in treating anxiety & depression

Doctor-trusted psychiatry medications starting at $85/month

On-demand treatment tutorials, medication management, and more in our mobile app

$99 online mental health counseling sessions with licensed therapists

Let’s focus on you. Beyond traditional therapy, take a mental health assessment and a provider will assess your mental health issues and get started on your specific treatment plan.

Available treatments

Anxiety & depression

For if you’re feeling anxious, depressed, or just not like yourself.

Sleep trouble

Anxiety and depression can affect your sleep—mental health treatment can help.

Burnout & job stress

If your colleagues don’t have your back, we do.

Major life events

Get support for breakups, grief, big moves, and more.

Doctor-trusted psychiatry medication. Try a consultation and a healthcare provider will see if medication is right for your mental health care plan.

Anxiety &
depression
medication

Bupropion XL

Generic for Wellbutrin XL®

Bupropion XL

Generic for Wellbutrin XL®

Buspirone HCI

Generic for Buspar®

Buspirone HCI

Generic for Buspar®

Duloxetine

Generic for Cymbalta®

Duloxetine

Generic for Cymbalta®

Escitalopram

Generic for Lexapro®

Escitalopram

Generic for Lexapro®

Venlafaxine

Generic for Effexor®

Venlafaxine

Generic for Effexor®

You time on your time. Choose a mental health professional and enjoy simple scheduling and messaging with online therapy services.

Online therapy

One video therapy session

50 minute video call session

One video therapy session

50 minute video call session

One month video therapy

Four 50 minute video call sessions

One month video therapy

Four 50 minute video call sessions

Find a better state of mind with a full routine of mental health supplements.

Mental health
supplements

Sleep Tight Gummies

$19

Additional fees may apply

Sleep Tight Gummies

$19

Additional fees may apply

Mind Unwind

$25

Additional fees may apply

Mind Unwind

$25

Additional fees may apply

Featured reviews

You’re not alone. Real reviews from women like you.

Candace

“Since my session I have still experienced some anxiety, but I feel like I am able to handle it and calm myself down now.”

Verified review

Ilyssa

“I got the help I needed, from the comfort of my couch...If you are struggling, Hers is the perfect place to begin your mental wellness journey.”
 

Verified review

Gabriela

“With Hims & Hers I paid 3x less for appointment & medication, with the certainty of a trustful and professional service.”

Verified review

Andrea

“It was easier and more affordable than I ever imagined to get my medication.”

Verified review

Taysha

“I have been subscribed for 6 months and I can honestly say I’m doing so much better.”

Verified review


What have you done for you lately?

Get special pricing for your first month of mental health treatment—just $25, if prescribed. Start your mental wellness journey whenever you’re ready.

741-741

If you're in emotional distress, text HOME to 741-741 to connect with a Crisis Text Line counselor immediately.

911

If you’re having a medical or mental health emergency, call 911 or go to your local ER.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Bupropion XL (bupropion hydrochloride) if you:
  • are allergic to Bupropion, as contained in bupropion hydrochloride, or any of the ingredients in Bupropion
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days
  • are already taking a medication containing bupropion
  • taking tamoxifen
  • have a medical history of a seizure disorder, anorexia nervosa, or bulimia nervosa
  • drink large amounts of alcohol, use recreational drugs or abuse prescription medications - or suddenly stop substance abuse habits
Bupropion can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • Confusion
  • Fainting
  • Seizures
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Auditory or visual hallucinations
  • Paranoia
Before you take Bupropion, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Bupropion may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Bupropion works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking and MAOI in the last 14 days
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Bupropion: constipation, decrease in appetite, dizziness, increased sweating, stomach pain, trembling, and unusual weight loss.
Bupropion (bupropion hydrochloride) is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and to help people quit smoking (smoking cessation). (May also be helpful when prescribed “off-label” for bipolar disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and sexual dysfunction due to SSRI antidepressants.)
Swallow the tablet whole. Do not break, crush or chew it.
If you miss a dose of this medicine, for the XL form, do not take an extra tablet to make up for the dose you forgot. Wait and take your next dose at your regular time the next day. Do not double doses.
Do not stop taking bupropion or change your dose without talking with your healthcare provider first.
While depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 4-6 weeks to improve, disturbances in sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

The information below includes important safety information about Buspirone, which is the generic version of the brand name drug BuSpar®. Read this information before you begin taking Buspirone. You must notify your healthcare provider if you start or stop taking Buspirone.

Do not take Buspirone if you:

  • Are allergic to Buspirone, or any of the ingredients in Buspirone
  • Have severe liver or kidney problems
  • Have benzodiazepine dependence
  • Take any medicines for Parkinson’s Disease or depression called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days as they may cause a dangerous increase in blood pressure. MAOIs include, but are not limited to:
    • isocarboxazid
    • phenelzine
    • rasagiline
    • selegiline
    • tranylcypromine
  • Take other medication that may cause an increase in serotonin levels, such as
    • linezolid
    • methylene blue
    • tryptophan

Before taking Buspirone, inform your healthcare provider and pharmacist about all prescription medications you are taking or plan to take, including those to treat Parkinson’s Disease or psychiatric disorders (including antidepressants or amphetamines) to avoid a potentially life-threatening condition called Serotonin Syndrome or a dangerous increase in blood pressure. Inform your healthcare provider about any over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and natural supplements, such as St. John’s Wort, that you are taking or plan to take to help avoid potentially dangerous drug-drug interactions. Be sure to mention to your prescriber if you drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit regularly.

Inform your healthcare provider immediately if you:

  • Become severely ill and have some or all of these symptoms: agitation, hallucinations, coma, or other changes in mental status; coordination problems or muscle twitching (overactive reflexes); racing heartbeat, high or low blood pressure; sweating or fever; nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; muscle tightness, as these may be the symptoms of a life-threatening condition called Serotonin Syndrome
  • Develop restlessness or an inability to remain still, involuntary movements, hostility, or depression
  • Have a rash, hives, swelling, or trouble breathing as these may be the symptoms of an allergic reaction
  • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding

Do not stop daily Buspirone without first talking to your healthcare provider. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: vomiting, irritability, dizziness, headaches, sensation of tingling skin, or trouble sleeping.

Until you experience how this medication affects you, do not drive a car, operate potentially dangerous machinery, or perform other dangerous activities.

You should take buspirone consistently, either always with or always without food.

During your treatment with buspirone, avoid drinking large amounts of grapefruit juice.

Avoid drinking alcohol while taking Buspirone.

The most common side effects in adults treated with Buspirone include:

  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Insomnia
  • Mild congestion
  • A very rare but serious side effect that may occur with buspirone therapy is serotonin syndrome. The symptoms of serotonin syndrome include, but are not limited to, a change in mental status, trouble speaking or swallowing, excessive sweating, tremors, involuntary muscle contractions, and increased body temperature. Seek emergent medical care if you are experiencing any of these symptoms as they could be a sign of a life-threatening condition.

If you miss a dose of buspirone, take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, then skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Citalopram if you:
  • are allergic to Citalopram, or any of the ingredients in Citalopram
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking and MAOI in the last 14 days
  • are on methadone
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Citalopram can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • increased bleeding (gums)
  • low sodium blood levels (symptoms may include headache, weakness and difficulty remembering or concentrating)
  • teeth grinding
  • seizure
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • at higher doses may cause abnormal electrical activity of the heart
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
Before you take Citalopram, tell your healthcare provider if you: have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Citalopram may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Citalopram works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid, amphetamines
  • anticoagulant therapy
  • certain antiarrhythmics: quinidine (Quinidex Extentabs®, Quinaglute®, Quinalan®), procainamide (Procanbid®, Pronestyl®, Pronestyl-SR®), amiodarone (Cordarone®, Pacerone®), sotalol (Betapace®, Sorine®)
  • certain antipsychotics: chlorpromazine (Thorazine®), thioridazine (Mellaril®)
  • certain antibiotics: gatifloxacin (Tequin®), moxifloxacin (Avelox®)
  • methadone
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Citalopram: diarrhea, nausea, increased sweating, nervousness, fatigue or feeling sleepy, insomnia.
Citalopram is a prescription medicine used to treat depression. (Off-label can be used to treat: obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia (also known as social anxiety disorder), posttraumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and alcohol dependence.)
If you miss a dose of citalopram, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not abruptly stop taking Citalopram even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: vomiting, irritability, dizziness, headaches, sensation of tingling skin, or nightmares.
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Duloxetine if you:
  • are allergic to Duloxetine, or any of the ingredients in Duloxetine
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days
  • have a medical history of a liver disease
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Duloxetine can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • liver failure, sometimes fatal
  • orthostatic hypotension,a drop in blood pressure when standing or getting up from sleep
  • increased risk of bleeding
  • increased heart rate
  • irregular menstrual cycle
  • frequency of urination or difficulty urinating
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
  • hypertensive crisis
  • Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (rash)
  • pancreatitis
Before you take Duloxetine, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Duloxetine may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Duloxetine works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid, amphetamines
  • anticoagulant therapy
  • cimetidine (Tagamet®)
  • ciprofloxacin (Cipro®)
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Duloxetine: headache, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, constipation, increased sweating, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects (such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay) or increased blood pressure. These often do not improve over time.
Duloxetine is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP), fibromyalgia, and chronic musculoskeletal pain.
Swallow the capsule whole. Do not break, crush or chew it. If you miss a dose of duloxetine take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not abruptly stop taking Duloxetine even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: vomiting, irritability, dizziness, headaches, sensation of tingling skin, or nightmares.
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Escitalopram if you:
  • are allergic to Escitalopram, or any of the ingredients in Escitalopram
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI in the last 14 days
  • also take pimozide (Orap) or citalopram (Celexa)
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Escitalopram can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • increased bleeding (gums)
  • low sodium blood levels (symptoms may include headache, weakness and difficulty remembering or concentrating)
  • teeth grinding
  • seizure
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
Before you take Escitalopram, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Escitalopram may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Escitalopram works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen)
  • warfarin, and other anticoagulants
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid, amphetamines
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Escitalopram: headache, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, increased sweating, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects, such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay often do not diminish over time.
Escitalopram is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). (May also be helpful when prescribed “off-label” for obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder.)
If you miss a dose of Escitalopram, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not abruptly stop taking Escitalopram even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: vomiting, irritability, dizziness, headaches, sensation of tingling skin, or nightmares.
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Fluoxetine if you:
  • are allergic to Fluoxetine, or any of the ingredients in Fluoxetine
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI within the last 14 days
  • taking tamoxifen
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Fluoxetine can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • low sodium blood levels (symptoms may include headache, weakness and difficulty remembering or concentrating)
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
  • increased bleeding (gums)
  • seizure
  • teeth grinding
  • QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmia including Torsades de Pointes (changes in the electrical activity of your heart; symptoms may include fast, slow or irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, and dizziness or fainting)
  • increased risk of bleeding events when combined with use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
Before you take Fluoxetine, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Fluoxetine may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Fluoxetine works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen)
  • warfarin, and other anticoagulants
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid, amphetamines
  • anticonvulsants (phenytoin, carbamazepine)
  • antipsychotics (haloperidol, aripiprazole)
  • atomoxetine
  • tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine, desipramine)
  • beta blockers (metoprolol, propranolol)
  • tamoxifen
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Fluoxetine: headache, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, increased sweating, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects, such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay often do not diminish over time.
Fluoxetine is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), panic disorder, bulimia nervosa, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). (may also be helpful when prescribed “off-label” for body dysmorphic disorder, dysthymia, or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).)
The delayed release form should be swallowed whole. Do not break, crush or chew it.
If you miss a dose of fluoxetine that you take daily, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. If you take fluoxetine once weekly, take it as soon as possible, then go back to your regular schedule the next week. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not stop taking fluoxetine, even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: vomiting, irritability, dizziness, headaches, sensation of tingling skin, or nightmares.
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging

Important Safety Information

Do not take Paroxetine if you:
  • are allergic to Paroxetine, or any of the ingredients in Fluoxetine
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI within the last 14 days
  • taking thioridazine
  • taking tamoxifen
  • taking pimozide
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Paroxetine can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • low sodium blood levels (symptoms may include headache, weakness and difficulty remembering or concentrating)
  • teeth grinding
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
  • seizure
  • increased risk of bleeding events when combined with use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
Before you take Paroxetine, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Paroxetine may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Paroxetine works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid, amphetamines
  • atomoxetine
  • antipsychotics (aripiprazole, risperidone)
  • warfarin
  • cardiac medications (propafenone, metoprolol, propranolol)
  • tricyclic antidepressants (desipramine, imipramine)
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Paroxetine: Headache, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, dry mouth, increased sweating, and dizziness, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy, or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects, such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay often do not diminish over time.
Paroxetine is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (social phobia), panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).
The controlled release form should be swallowed whole. Do not break, crush or chew it.
If you miss a dose of paroxetine, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not stop taking paroxetine, even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: nausea, sweating, dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances as electric shock sensations, tremor, anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, ringing in the ears, and seizures.
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Sertraline if you:
  • are allergic to Sertraline, or any of the ingredients in Sertraline
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI within the last 2 weeks
  • taking pimozide
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Sertraline can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • low sodium blood levels (symptoms may include headache, weakness and difficulty remembering or concentrating)
  • teeth grinding
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
  • seizure
  • increased risk of bleeding events when combined with use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
Before you take Sertraline, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Sertraline may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Sertraline works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid
  • aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
  • disulfiram due to the alcohol content of the concentrate - if sertraline in liquid form
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away over the first week or two as your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Sertraline: Headache, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, increased sweating, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects, such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay often do not diminish over time.
Sertraline is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder. (May also be helpful when prescribed “off-label” for binge-eating disorder, bulimia nervosa, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).)
If you miss a dose of sertraline, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not stop taking sertraline, even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: irritability, nausea, feeling dizzy, vomiting, nightmares, headache, and/or paresthesias (prickling, tingling sensation on the skin).
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If needed, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If you no longer need your medication, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.

Important Safety Information

Do not take Venlafaxine if you:
  • are allergic to Venlafaxine, or any of the ingredients in Venlafaxine
  • take any medicines called monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), or if you have stopped taking an MAOI within the last 14 days
  • are drinking alcohol
  • are using or abusing recreation drugs or prescription medications
Venlafaxine can cause serious side effects. Rarely reported side effects include:
  • increased heart rate, low blood pressure
  • increased salivation
  • irregular menstrual cycle
  • increased frequency of urination, difficulty urinating
  • changes in taste
  • low sodium (symptoms of low sodium levels may include headache, weakness, difficulty concentrating and remembering)
  • teeth grinding
  • angle closure glaucoma (symptoms of angle closure glaucoma may include eye pain, changes in vision, swelling or redness in or around eye)
  • serotonin syndrome (symptoms may include shivering, diarrhea, confusion, severe muscle tightness, fever, seizures, and death)
  • increased risk of bleeding events when combined with use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
Before you take Venlafaxine, tell your healthcare provider if you:
  • have thoughts of suicide or harming yourself
  • have a history of psychiatric or medical problems, including bipolar disorder
  • have taken any medication in the past for your condition, whether effective or not
  • have suffered adverse or side effects from previous medication therapies
  • are receiving any non-medication treatment, such as talk therapy
  • drink alcohol or use/abuse recreational or prescription drugs
  • are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding
Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbal supplements, and recreational drugs.
Venlafaxine may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect the way Venlafaxine works, causing side effects. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you take any of the following:
  • any other serotonergic medications, migraine medications (triptans), pain medications, antibiotic linezolid
  • aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen, naproxen), warfarin, and other anticoagulants
During treatment with this medication, the side effects of this medication may go away over the first one to two weeks your body adjusts to the medication. The most common side effects of Venlafaxine: headache, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, increased sweating, feeling nervous, restless, fatigued, sleepy or having trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sexual side effects, such as problems with orgasm or ejaculatory delay, increased blood pressure often do not improve over time.
Venlafaxine is a prescription medicine used to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, and social anxiety disorder (social phobia.
Extended release tablets should be swallowed whole. Do not break, crush or chew it. Extended release capsules: swallow whole or sprinkle onto food, such as applesauce or pudding and eat immediately.
If you miss a dose of venlafaxine, take it as soon as you remember, unless it is closer to the time of your next dose. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Do not double your next dose or take more than what is prescribed.
Do not stop taking venlafaxine, even when you feel better. Abruptly stopping can cause withdrawal symptoms including: irritability, nausea, feeling dizzy, vomiting, nightmares, headache, and/or paresthesias (prickling, tingling sensation on the skin).
Sleep, energy, or appetite may show some improvement within the first 1-2 weeks. Improvement in these physical symptoms can be an important early signal that the medication is working. Depressed mood and lack of interest in activities may need up to 6-8 weeks to fully improve.
Patients, their families, and caregivers should be alert to the emergence of anxiety, restlessness, irritability, aggressiveness and insomnia. If these symptoms emerge, they should be reported to the patient’s prescriber or healthcare professional. All patients being treated with antidepressants for any indication should watch for and notify their healthcare provider for worsening symptoms, suicidality and unusual changes in behavior, especially during the first few months of treatment.
If you no longer need your medication, the best way to dispose of most types of old, unused, unwanted, or expired medicines (both prescription and over the counter) is to drop off the medicine at a drug take back site, location, or program immediately. You can use the DEA DIVERSION CONTROL DIVISION LOOKUP to find your nearest drug disposal site.
If no drug take back sites, locations, or programs are available in your area, and there are no specific disposal instructions (such as flushing) in the medication guide or package insert, you can follow these simple steps to dispose of most medicines in your trash at home:
  • Mix medicines (liquid or pills; do not crush tablets or capsules) with an unappealing substance such as dirt, cat litter, or used coffee grounds;
  • Place the mixture in a container such as a sealed plastic bag;
  • Throw away the container in your trash at home; and
  • Delete all personal information on the prescription label of empty medicine bottles or medicine packaging, then trash or recycle the empty bottle or packaging.